Comments on: Virtual Worlds on facebook? http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946 Sense-making strategies and user-driven innovations in virtual worlds Fri, 12 Apr 2013 15:45:55 +0200 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.9.1 hourly 1 By: filmanal.eu http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-98327 filmanal.eu Fri, 12 Apr 2013 15:45:55 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-98327 Everyone loves what you guys tend to be up too. This sort of clever work and exposure! Keep up the terrific works guys I've added you guys to my blogroll. Everyone loves what you guys tend to be up too. This sort of clever work and
exposure! Keep up the terrific works guys I’ve added you guys to my blogroll.

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By: Mary http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-14525 Mary Sun, 19 Jun 2011 22:33:12 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-14525 the converstation about the term 'virtual world' is kind of unimportant because the purpose of a game is not to see what it's going to be called rather it is about the excitement of the game and the fun features it has, who cares if people call it a virtual world OR virtual enviroment, is it gonna kill somebody that its going to be called that. Anyway what are these responses supposed to be about? the terms used for these kind of games OR if they are good games worth playing? i am confused . maybe i need to find out what this website is all about . =) the converstation about the term ‘virtual world’ is kind of unimportant because the purpose of a game is not to see what it’s going to be called rather it is about the excitement of the game and the fun features it has, who cares if people call it a virtual world OR virtual enviroment, is it gonna kill somebody that its going to be called that. Anyway what are these responses supposed to be about? the terms used for these kind of games OR if they are good games worth playing? i am confused . maybe i need to find out what this website is all about . =)

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By: Get Facebook Fans http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-6232 Get Facebook Fans Thu, 16 Dec 2010 03:23:33 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-6232 Totally agree. Found this nice web site whilst looking for a decent one to remark on. Effectively finished! Totally agree. Found this nice web site whilst looking for a decent one to remark on. Effectively finished!

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By: Koster: Virtual worlds are not what they used to become – Virtual Worlds Research Project http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-2142 Koster: Virtual worlds are not what they used to become – Virtual Worlds Research Project Fri, 23 Apr 2010 15:34:38 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-2142 [...] an earlier post, CarrieLynn asked “Do these facebook apps qualify to be virtual worlds? And why or why [...] [...] an earlier post, CarrieLynn asked “Do these facebook apps qualify to be virtual worlds? And why or why [...]

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By: CarrieLynn http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-1436 CarrieLynn Wed, 31 Mar 2010 12:08:34 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-1436 Just to note, virtual world Habbo is also on Facebook, with various versions of its Habbo Hotel, such as this one, the Habbo Hotel UK: http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=140597994210. As with Small Worlds, here is a browser-based virtual world / social game that exists outside of Facebook but has developed an application for Habbo users to access their accounts via the Facebook website. Just to note, virtual world Habbo is also on Facebook, with various versions of its Habbo Hotel, such as this one, the Habbo Hotel UK: http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=140597994210. As with Small Worlds, here is a browser-based virtual world / social game that exists outside of Facebook but has developed an application for Habbo users to access their accounts via the Facebook website.

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By: Farmville http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-1305 Farmville Thu, 18 Mar 2010 19:07:53 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-1305 farmville is the best game ever and this is the best blog post! farmville is the best game ever and this is the best blog post!

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By: Dina http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-1302 Dina Thu, 18 Mar 2010 14:59:38 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-1302 That’s why my suggestion was to *include* a psychological approach. Use is as yet another view that offers perspective and raises new questions. I did not see it as something that should replace the approaches that takes reception, networks, or human/nonhuman agents as their main points of interest. Coming from an STS background usually my starting point is to capture dynamics as you mentioned. The psychological approach was just yet another dimension that I found interesting to throw it into the discussion. That being said I find it fascinating to read different studies and see what (be it internal as I psychology, external, as in network analysis, or somewhere in-between) such approaches ascribe as important when defining virtual worlds or spaces. That’s why my suggestion was to *include* a psychological approach. Use is as yet another view that offers perspective and raises new questions. I did not see it as something that should replace the approaches that takes reception, networks, or human/nonhuman agents as their main points of interest.
Coming from an STS background usually my starting point is to capture dynamics as you mentioned. The psychological approach was just yet another dimension that I found interesting to throw it into the discussion.
That being said I find it fascinating to read different studies and see what (be it internal as I psychology, external, as in network analysis, or somewhere in-between) such approaches ascribe as important when defining virtual worlds or spaces.

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By: Game Developers Conference — A Focus on Hardware? – Virtual Worlds Research Project http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-1212 Game Developers Conference — A Focus on Hardware? – Virtual Worlds Research Project Sat, 13 Mar 2010 15:31:51 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-1212 [...] lucrative, type of multiplayer games — the social games — such as those that occur on facebook that I have discussed on this blog. There was also attention paid to understanding the user, at [...] [...] lucrative, type of multiplayer games — the social games — such as those that occur on facebook that I have discussed on this blog. There was also attention paid to understanding the user, at [...]

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By: CarrieLynn http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-1166 CarrieLynn Tue, 09 Mar 2010 14:37:48 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-1166 The one thing I would caution, Dina, is the "phenomenological trap" -- where instead of ascribing causation for presence only to the technology, you would do the opposite and ascribe it as within only the user's purview. Presence -- or whatever other words you want to use to discuss that "sense of being there" -- like many other phenomena, is a combination of cues/constraints of material reality and the interpretation of that material reality by the user. It is not a balancing game but a constant flow of back-and-forth and side-to-side and up-and-down and so forth. It is a process of engaging, and thus a complex one at that. The one thing I would caution, Dina, is the “phenomenological trap” — where instead of ascribing causation for presence only to the technology, you would do the opposite and ascribe it as within only the user’s purview. Presence — or whatever other words you want to use to discuss that “sense of being there” — like many other phenomena, is a combination of cues/constraints of material reality and the interpretation of that material reality by the user. It is not a balancing game but a constant flow of back-and-forth and side-to-side and up-and-down and so forth. It is a process of engaging, and thus a complex one at that.

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By: Dina Friis Toft http://worlds.ruc.dk/archives/1946/comment-page-1#comment-906 Dina Friis Toft Sat, 13 Feb 2010 09:45:38 +0000 http://worlds.ruc.dk/?p=1946#comment-906 Sisse wrote: <em>“Rather than defining it, I seek to understand what it is that creates the feeling of engaging with a world, if so.” </em> I find this approach very intriguing. I am reviewing Interface Fantasy: A Lacanian Cyborg Ontology ( André Nusselder 2009). This book takes a perspective on fantasy as an interface. I am quite content that Nusselder’s approach can add a new dimension to our understanding of how people engage with and perceive what is meditated through ICTs, as well as what creates the feeling of engaging with a world. In relation to the tensions between the roles ascribed to technology, as either passive mediators (as mere extension of human needs and desires), or as sociotechnical ensembles of heterogeneous human and nonhuman actors, “Interface Fantasy” promises a new point of view from which to approach people’s engagement with ICT (which can also include virtual worlds). Whereas most STS - studies have focused on materiality, agency, and connections as key concepts, thereby treating the mediator as something outside the individual user, this book adds another dimension since cyberspace is perceived as a mental space, where fantasy as something internal mediates whatever is shared. I think this can be interesting as the focus is not on the technology, (whether 3D or not) neither on the connections, (whether you are engaging with your Facebook friends or meet new ones), nor your representation (to which extend you qualify as an avatar). From this perspective focusing on presence, or sense of being in a world, becomes a matter of the individual and his/her experience. This makes the question<em> “Does Second life provide us with more presence or sense of being than Farmville?”</em> uninteresting. As, instead, we focus on people’s ability to <em>feel</em> that they are in a particular world. I recently interviewed a guy from a advertising agency asking why they did not focus on virtual worlds I their campaigns. He told me that he did not know how to relate to it. He described his first encounter as: meeting a woman, being introduced to one of her male friends, and, suddenly, finding himself in the middle of a sex game he did not understand. For him there was no sense of presence at all, his experience turned the virtual world into a very visible and confusing mediator. Similarly Carie Heeter (“Reflections on Real Presence by a Virtual Person” 2003 p 336) argues that real presence is not only a matter of sensory realism and “real” stimuli. She illustrates this by her visit to the space shuttle Enterprise. Despite the total physical realism, she did not particularly feel that she was there, because her sense of presence was dampened by expectations, lack of familiarity, limited prior experience, and limited cognitive schemas. So my suggestion would be to include a psychological perspective, defining virtual worlds not from the ways in which people can interact, are connected, or from their goals in the world (as in Carries description above), but instead from the sense of being present that people experience. Sisse wrote: “Rather than defining it, I seek to understand what it is that creates the feeling of engaging with a world, if so.” I find this approach very intriguing.

I am reviewing Interface Fantasy: A Lacanian Cyborg Ontology ( André Nusselder 2009). This book takes a perspective on fantasy as an interface. I am quite content that Nusselder’s approach can add a new dimension to our understanding of how people engage with and perceive what is meditated through ICTs, as well as what creates the feeling of engaging with a world.

In relation to the tensions between the roles ascribed to technology, as either passive mediators (as mere extension of human needs and desires), or as sociotechnical ensembles of heterogeneous human and nonhuman actors, “Interface Fantasy” promises a new point of view from which to approach people’s engagement with ICT (which can also include virtual worlds). Whereas most STS – studies have focused on materiality, agency, and connections as key concepts, thereby treating the mediator as something outside the individual user, this book adds another dimension since cyberspace is perceived as a mental space, where fantasy as something internal mediates whatever is shared.

I think this can be interesting as the focus is not on the technology, (whether 3D or not) neither on the connections, (whether you are engaging with your Facebook friends or meet new ones), nor your representation (to which extend you qualify as an avatar). From this perspective focusing on presence, or sense of being in a world, becomes a matter of the individual and his/her experience.

This makes the question “Does Second life provide us with more presence or sense of being than Farmville?” uninteresting. As, instead, we focus on people’s ability to feel that they are in a particular world.

I recently interviewed a guy from a advertising agency asking why they did not focus on virtual worlds I their campaigns. He told me that he did not know how to relate to it. He described his first encounter as: meeting a woman, being introduced to one of her male friends, and, suddenly, finding himself in the middle of a sex game he did not understand. For him there was no sense of presence at all, his experience turned the virtual world into a very visible and confusing mediator.

Similarly Carie Heeter (“Reflections on Real Presence by a Virtual Person” 2003 p 336) argues that real presence is not only a matter of sensory realism and “real” stimuli. She illustrates this by her visit to the space shuttle Enterprise. Despite the total physical realism, she did not particularly feel that she was there, because her sense of presence was dampened by expectations, lack of familiarity, limited prior experience, and limited cognitive schemas.

So my suggestion would be to include a psychological perspective, defining virtual worlds not from the ways in which people can interact, are connected, or from their goals in the world (as in Carries description above), but instead from the sense of being present that people experience.

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